Wednesday, 26 September 2018

No soft soap for the President



It was followed by that other beauty, Jon Sopel, sneering again whilst mocking President Trump for his UN speech. He has stopped reporting news of events completely and now just gives his personal opinions on the negative aspects of Trump's engagements and he always finds plenty of negatives.
Well, yes. Here's how that report began:
Jon Sopel: When roads are closed for you and red lights really aren't a thing, there's not much excuse for being half an hour late for a journey of less than a mile. But Donald Trump missed his speaking slot this morning and made himself even later by stopping to talk to reporters on his way in. But when he did get under way, he went on a bit of a victory lap, with unexpected consequences. 
Donald Trump: In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country. America's... So true. [LAUGHTER]. Didn't expect that reaction, but that's OK. 
The audience just giggled. US presidents are occasionally reviled, sometimes adored, but they're rarely laughed at.   

13 comments:

  1. As I remarked on another thread, when you see anything more than the few milliseconds clip the BBC, Sky and ITV like to show, it was more like the President charmed them with his off the cuff quip about "not expecting that". There were a few mild titters at the beginning - no doubt from "the naughty boys at the back" unconvinced by his confident claim. But the real laughter was firstly a response to his folksy "so true"...and it didn't sound to me aggressive, but more suggested amusement at the way he was complimenting his own performance within the speech ...and then when the President delivered his good natured quip, he got appreciative laughter and applause. So, to sum it all up as "he was laughed at by the Assembly" is just Fake News, folks...it really is, so true...I mean it.

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    1. I've added a video of the full speech. The bit in question happens within the first minute. It looks exactly as you describe it to me too.

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    2. Sopel's life story book would have the title: 'Trump - My part in his downfall' (due credit to Spike here). The problem is, he's started writing the manuscript way too early, and he's invested so many hours and words into the story that he can't turn back.

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    3. There's a touch of the Alistair Cookes about that meandering way of making a report. Well, he was writing a letter so I suppose there's some excuse. How long does it take a BBC reporter to get to the point and never mind the fancy essay writing? Frank Muir and Dennis Norden did preposterously contrived longwinded storytelling for entertainment. Not much of that with Mr Negative gloom merchant Sopel.

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    4. There was a whopper (in both senses)a while back by Nick Bryant, who is allegedly "the New York correspondent" (but rarely reports on New York (why would he - apart from being a money-making town, it doesn't have a lot of intrinsic interest for Brits - another example of the BBC frittering away its money). It went on for about 12,000 words and was replete with (boring) references to Nick's childhood but was 90% anti-Trump vitriol, whilst posing as a meditation on the history of the USA over the last 50 years. It was like the first draft of one of those books, BBC reporters write to clean up some further dosh. The funniest part was where Bryant genuflected to Reagan! I am old enough to remember how much the BBC hated Reagan and how their negativity towards him seemed incredibly biased at the time (but that was of course before the anti-Trump bias went stratospheric and broke all world records).

      Why was the "New York" correspondent allowed such an indulgence - a huge chunk of website space to tell us he hates Trump, something we knew already.

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    5. None of the sharp quick New York style has rubbed off on him!

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    6. I really doubt he spends any time in New York at all!!

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  2. Wow I hadn’t heard the actual speech before now just the “news” on the BBC - utterly fake news.

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  3. Agree with MB, I heard the fuller excerpt, I think on Fox, and got the clear impression that the audience laughed with Trump, and also that Trump came over as engaged and rather good natured.

    Sometimes Fox play his speeches at rallies unedited in real time. I've heard two or three and they are riveting listening. Actually interesting, practical and delivered by a real person, not a empty, sound-bite seeking, virtue-signalling politico like his predecessor or May. No wonder they hate him.

    There's no point at all to tune-in to the BBC to hear how Sopel or the other BBC parasites want to repackage these speeches.

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  4. Nick Bryant did much the same tonight on Trump chairing the UN Security Council meeting. I think the transcript will show Bryant firing off criticism after criticism, trying to cause Trump maximum damage with personal attacks rather than just reporting.

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  5. I wonder what the general population would make of a week's worth of genuine news reporting from the BBC. Not one eyed opinion pieces, presenting social media tittle tattle as fact or character assassinations. Just the news. As it happened. And let us decide on our own opinions.

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  6. I think the majority of the population can see through the BBCs propaganda, lies and manipulation of the news. However there will be a sizeable minority who swallow it hook, line and sinker. Whether they be naive, gullible or uninformed is unimportant - the danger is that they have been influenced and it may be decisive at the ballot box.

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    1. Disagree on the majority etc. From my point of view, most of my friends do not like Trump and accept the MSM/BBC view of him. Others like and watch the BBC because "it doesn't have adverts and they are pain to watch." And, as we know, Auntie Beeb has a charter that makes it report impartially........

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